CNSI is celebrating Black History Month with the help of our new Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Council. This group identifies and communicates the myriad ways we can acknowledge and celebrate our differences and create a culture where we all feel included. History is filled with people from all different economic backgrounds, ethnicities, and cultures who have contributed to making our world a better place. Those contributions impact our lives in a variety of ways, from the food we eat, to the sports we watch, the books we read, the music we listen to and the COVID vaccines we will hopefully all get very soon!

Black Americans have played a critical role in helping to advance America’s business, political and cultural landscape into what it is today. Instead of focusing exclusively on well-known Black history makers, such as Harriett Tubman, Frederick Douglass and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., CNSI is also celebrating modern day Black American leaders, scientists, authors, filmmakers, and chefs. We are collecting stories of Black excellence and influence from the CNSI global team and sharing them on our #ONECNSI employee communication platform.

CNSI celebrates holidays and observance months in the U.S. and India because we believe continued education leads to better understanding and deeper connections with one another. In that spirit of connection and celebration, CNSI’s CEO, Todd Stottlemyer, issued the following statement:

At CNSI, we fully embrace differences in race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, and ability as central to our core values. We seek to educate and celebrate how our differences unite us and make us individually better and collectively stronger as a company. Diversity and inclusion power our healthcare technology innovation and inspire us to develop the best products and solutions. We are better as a company when the people we employ reflect our clients and the people they serve.

We at CNSI invite you to observe, celebrate, and learn more about the contributions of Black Americans.